The only cure for the blues is the Blues at Agnes

Bonnie Kaye and the Bonafides

 

It’s Friday afternoon and a black sky was hard on the heels of this motorist heading to the Deep South of the Great Barrier Reef, to the Agnes Blues Roots and Rock Festival:

But the weather remained fine and dandy, as hippies, rock chicks, grommets, VIPS, gypsies, families, middle-aged dudes with piercings, bucket hat wearing 10-year-olds and musicians gathered for the weekend to stomp their feet to a fantastically diverse selection of music.

“CLUB CLOSED TONIGHT: GO TO THE BLUES” read the sign at the Captain Creek Community Sport & Rec club ten minutes out of town, the regular weekend jams replaced by an influx of out-of-town and local talent at the popular festival

Almost half of the in excess of 700 tickets sold to the annual festival were advance sales, making it the biggest year for the festival yet, injecting an estimated $280,000 into the local economy.

Fabienne Wintle, vice-president of the Discovery Coast Tourism and Commerce it was a highlight of the year for many locals, with a lot of visitors making a holiday of it:

“You can see from our ticket sales stats and some of the feedback we’re getting at the gate, that people are making a week of it,” she said.

“We sell a lot of three day passes.”

Some of the biggest turnouts were on Sunday when Nowra trio 19-Twenty took the stage for a second time, after blowing away the Saturday night crowd with their extremely entertaining blues rock.

Singer and guitarist Kane Denelly, originally from Goulburn, said they’d returned to Agnes after having such a great time at the 2017 festival: “You guys make it so easy,” he said.

Many locals would also be familiar with the top-notch good time the trio – also including drummer Syd Green and double bassist John Jakob Gwilliam – provided at the inaugural Under the Trees Festival at Boyne Island last year.

Other festival highlights were a relentless Friday night performance by swamp rock gods Marshall and the Fro, during which local muso Jack Blandford took to the stage, borrowing Marshall’s guitar and busting out some hot licks while Marshall drummed with a surprised – but impressed! – look on his face.

Jack took the stage again on Saturday as part of the backing band for Sunshine Coast singer, Olivia Ruth, who sounds uncannily like Janis Joplin.

While the music was rowdy, the crowd were mellow:

“It’s so great to see people enjoying themselves and have a good time; it’s been an amazing weekend and with everyone dancing and the police have said that everyone has been well-behaved,” Ms Wintle said.

It’s Friday afternoon and a black sky was hard on the heels of this motorist heading to the Deep South of the Great Barrier Reef, to the Agnes Blues Roots and Rock Festival:

But the weather remained fine and dandy, as hippies, rock chicks, grommets, VIPS, gypsies, families, middle-aged dudes with piercings, bucket hat wearing 10-year-olds and musicians gathered for the weekend to stomp their feet to a fantastically diverse selection of music.

“CLUB CLOSED TONIGHT: GO TO THE BLUES” read the sign at the Captain Creek Community Sport & Rec club ten minutes out of town, the regular weekend jams replaced by an influx of out-of-town and local talent at the popular festival

Almost half of the in excess of 700 tickets sold to the annual festival were advance sales, making it the biggest year for the festival yet, injecting an estimated $280,000 into the local economy.

Fabienne Wintle, vice-president of the Discovery Coast Tourism and Commerce it was a highlight of the year for many locals, with a lot of visitors making a holiday of it:

“You can see from our ticket sales stats and some of the feedback we’re getting at the gate, that people are making a week of it,” she said.

“We sell a lot of three day passes.”

Some of the biggest turnouts were on Sunday when Goulburn trio 19-Twenty took the stage for a second time, after blowing away the Saturday night crowd with their extremely entertaining blues rock.

Singer and guitarist Kane Denelly, originally from Goulburn, said they’d returned to Agnes after having such a great time at the 2017 festival: “You guys make it so easy,” he said.

Many locals would also be familiar with the top-notch good time the trio – also including drummer Syd Green and double bassist John Jakob Gwilliam – provided at the inaugural Under the Trees Festival at Boyne Island last year.

Other festival highlights were a relentless Friday night performance by swamp rock gods Marshall and the Fro, during which local muso Jack Blandford took to the stage, borrowing Marshall’s guitar and busting out some hot licks while Marshall drummed with a surprised – but impressed! – look on his face.

Jack took the stage again on Saturday as part of the backing band for Sunshine Coast singer, Olivia Ruth, who sounds uncannily like Janis Joplin.

While the music was rowdy, the crowd were mellow:

“It’s so great to see people enjoying themselves and have a good time; it’s been an amazing weekend and with everyone dancing and the police have said that everyo been well-behaved,” Ms Wintle said.