Learning From Home

Learning From Home

ON THE 13TH OF APRIL, THE QUEENSLAND GOVERNMENT ANNOUNCED THAT FOR THE FIRST FIVE WEEKS OF TERM TWO, THE STATE WOULD USE REMOTE LEARNING OR LEARNING FROM HOME.

 

Children of essential workers, however, can continue to attend in person as schools will remain open. This has left many parents across the state with the daunting task of trying learning from home for the very first time. If you’re one of these parents now having to add ‘teacher’ to your resume with no experience, here are a few tips to get you started.

Leaders and teachers ensure that challenging, purposeful, interesting learning can continue if our students are unable to come to school and need to Learn from Home. Learning from Home will include:

  • Learning resources available through your school’s chosen platform
  • Explicit instruction
  • Time for students to practise routines
  • Processes for students to submit completed tasks
  • Feedback to support learning progress

Set up a learning space

Create a designated area in the house for the child to be able to focus on learning. The area aims to limit distractions. Turning the TV off and switching off app notifications will help tremendously.  It’s also worth considering the technology that may be required, programs like Zoom or Skype may need to be downloaded to allow teachers to deliver lessons online. It’s also important to manage eSafety to ensure your family has a safe, positive experience online.

Create Structure

Structure, scheduling and routine is critical in regulating mental health and learning. Mainstream schools have a timetabled structure throughout the week, so rather than disrupting the  child’s established routine, you might wish to follow the schools routine. Online learning is really hard for a lot of people and certain children will do better in different learning environments, so it’s important to know your child and their learning style.

Do passion projects

Now is the perfect time for kids to pursue interests they haven’t had time to focus on in the past. Ask your child what they’re interested in and negotiate how they will balance interests and tasks the school has set.

Student Wellbeing

Taking frequent breaks throughout the day is not simply downtime for students but increases productivity, boosts brain function and decreases stress. Exercise is especially helpful as it increases blood flow and oxygenation in the brain, improving attention and memory, increasing brain activity and cognitive function, and enhancing mood and ability to cope with stress.

Seek help from teachers & school

If you’re overwhelmed with all the large amount online resources don’t be afraid to reach out to the Catholic education teachers and school for additional resources and advice.